Tuesday, 9 April 2019

Has Mike Pitts found the last missing stonehole?

On Twitter:






Mike Pitts @pittsmike Apr 7

The promo video for a #Stonehenge exhibition in Kansas City includes an extraordinary aerial film clip showing the best photographic record I’ve seen of the parch marks revealed in summer 2013. https://www.unionstation.org/stonehenge/index.php


Tim Daw @TimothyDaw 7:33 AM - Apr 9, 2019

@pittsmike you have spotted Stone 24 (possible) stone hole - I have looked at lots of aerial shots and not seen it. In 2013 I looked hard for it and couldn't see it, ony could imagine it. Congratulations.



Sunday, 31 March 2019

Concrete Prehistories: The Making of Megalithic Modernism

Concrete Prehistories: The Making of Megalithic Modernism

Helen Wickstead, Martyn Barber
Issued Date: 2 Sep 2015

Abstract


After water, concrete is the most consumed substance on earth. Every year enough cement is produced to manufacture around six billion cubic metres of concrete . This paper investigates how concrete has been built into the construction of modern prehistories. We present an archaeology of concrete in the prehistoric landscapes of Stonehenge and Avebury, where concrete is a major component of megalithic sites restored between 1901 and 1964. We explore how concreting changed between 1901 and the Second World War, and the implications of this for constructions of prehistory. We discuss the role of concrete in debates surrounding restoration, analyze the semiotics of concrete equivalents for the megaliths, and investigate how concreting became meaningful in interpretations of prehistoric building activities. The archaeology of megalithic concrete illustrates the untimeliness of concrete as a technology that entangles ancient and modern.

Download 

https://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/33941/1/Wickstead-H-33941-AAM.pdf

Tan Hill Experimental Firing Range

In the 1950s there was an experimental artillery firing range on the Marlborough Downs - Gunsight Lane in West Kennet is presumably named after its use or construction for the range. On Tan Hill there were telegraph posts running along the Wansdyke and what I remember as a flag pole. There was also a strange thick (two or three inches) iron plate that had been used as a target. Seeing two inch holes through it impressed me as a child.

31 March 2019 - I was pleased to find a pole, the plate and the concrete base of the scaffold all still there.

Plate, concrete base and the top of Silbury Hill in alignment.













The concrete plinth on Google Maps


Tuesday, 15 January 2019

Chubb's 400 yard Mystery

When Cecil Chubb gifted Stonehenge he put some conditions in the Deed , the third one was;

Thirdly that no building or erection other than a pay box similar to the Pay Box now standing on the premises shall be erected on any part of the premises within four hundred yards of The Milestone marked “Amesbury 2” on the northern frontage of the premises.

I have wondered why, and if I have been told I can no longer remember, did he stipulate a a 400 yard radius circle rather than just say "within the premises"?



A quick sketch shows his 400 yards almost covers the whole of his gifted land apart from the tips of two corners. Is that deliberate?

Of course within a few years the curators houses had been built with in the 400 yards so it appears his wishes were ignored from the earliest of days.

And ironically he chose the one stone in the landscape that was then moved, to the other side of the road.

The Deed - http://www.sarsen.org/2013/12/cecil-chubbs-deed-of-gift-of-stonehenge.html